15 Reasons to Give up Alcohol

15 Reasons to Give up Alcohol

If you’ve tried Dry July, or have chosen to remain sober for a set period of time, you know the health benefits of giving up alcohol are astronomical. While it’s not bad to have a drink in moderation every now and then, if alcohol is negatively impacting your life and your health, you may need to take steps to stop drinking it all together.

A while ago, Watersedge put together the 30 Day Challenge, where we challenge you to go one month without drinking alcohol. Aside from having a clearer head, staying sober is better for your liver, your wallet and often, your relationships.

Take a look at this infographic by Recovery Steps that shares some of the other benefits of going alcohol free.

If alcohol is negatively affecting you or your loved ones, sign up for our 30 Day Challenge here. We’ll send you a FREE tip everyday, empowering you to take care of yourself, nurture your relationships and life a fulfilling life.

15 Reasons to Give up Alcohol Infographic

Are you concerned about your drinking habits? Do you want to make hang overs and intoxicated arguments a thing of the past? Contact Watersedgecounselling on 0434 337 245 for a FREE 10-minute phone consultation on how we can best help you or press book now to book in our online diary.

The Enneagram, Addiction and Recovery

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We have long appreciated the personality theory of the Enneagram. It enables us to better understand one another, and means we can pin point what motivates people into a healthy and unhealthy state.

That begs the questions—could the Enneagram help us understand the path to addiction? And if so, perhaps it could assist people as they enter recovery.

This video interview from Enneagram Studies tackles these questions, intertwining a person's narrative or story with the Enneagram to provide insight into addictive behaviour.

In this video, TALK Editor Evangeline Welch interviews Renee Siegel for Enneagram Association in the Narrative Tradition. The interview identifies the typical patterns of addiction for each space—being what they refer to as Head types (Types 5-7), Gut types (Types 8-1) and Heart types (Types 2-4). They also delve into how each type behaves in addiction.

Focusing on the body as an energy system, the interview discusses what prompts different types to enter addictive behaviors, and what these often look like for each type, from eating disorders, gambling, workaholism, substance abuse, alcoholism or sexual acts.

Take a look at this video and let us know what it teaches you about the Enneagram’s role in addiction and recovery.

Are you or a loved one struggling with addiction? Do you want to learn more about the Enneagram and how it can help you enter recovery? Here’s what you need to do: contact WatersedgeCounselling on 0434 337 245 for a FREE 10-minute phone consultation on how we can best help you, or press book now to book in our online diary.

The Do’s and Don’ts Of Supporting a Loved One In Recovery

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We all desperately want to help a loved one in need. Families will often see first hand the dramatic side effects of drug and alcohol use, and it is natural for us to try and aid those we care about so they enter recovery and break the cycle.

All too often though, we can feel like more of a hindrance than a help. Everything we do to ‘help’ leaves us empty, and our loved one remains unchanged. This infographic by Morningside Recovery shows us the Do’s and Don’ts of supporting a loved one in recovery from an addiction.

Breaking down the stereotype that we need to confront them aggressively about addiction, and rather approach them openly and honestly, it shows us that we need to be willing to go through the long haul of recovery with them and stay committed to the journey.

Take a look at the infographic for more Do’s and Don’ts, and let us know how you support a loved one recovering from an addiction in the comment section.

The Do’s and Don’ts Of Supporting a Loved One In Recovery

Do you want to know more about supporting a loved one to break addiction? Do you struggle with substance abuse? Then here’s what you need to do: contact Colleen on 0434 337 245 or Duncan on 0434 331 243 for a FREE 10-minute phone consultation on how she can best help you, or press book now to book on the online diary.

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The Long Term Effects of Heroin Addiction

It is increasingly common for people of all walks of life to use heroin. It is no longer just a teenage fad, but a drug which enters workplaces, damages relationships and can do long term harm to a person’s health. You may be able to identify when a person is using heroin, but do you know the long term effects of the drug use?

This infographic by Addiction Blog shows us the science and the consequences of heroin use. Far from being a substance you can just ‘shake off,’ heroin enters your blood and affects many areas of the brain, including the cerebral cortex (your vision), brain stem and your spinal cord. Often people who continually consume drugs find themselves upping their dosage to receive the same high they did when they started. Their tolerance of heroin increases, and this is due to the opiates enacted when the heroin reaches our brain.

So how does the science of heroin use impact our body?

The amount of side effects that come with heroin use is staggering, and among them are nausea, pain modulation, sedation, delusions and hallucinations. While heroin use may initially feel good, the high covers a variety of dangerous symptoms that can severely change our lives.

Permanent side effects include kidney failure, a damaged brain stem and infection of the heart lining and valves, and we see that any use of heroin will dramatically alter your body. Reversible side effects include a running nose, watery eyes and blood poisoning. Not very glamorous, is it?

And if you think this a drug you can take once and stop, think again. Heroin is one of the most addictive drugs available, and each time you take it, it is increasingly more difficult to stop. We find heroin use continually takes over every aspect of a person’s life. Not just their health, but their mental and emotional state, their capacity to work and their relationships.

Do you know anyone who takes heroin? Are you concerned for their health and wellbeing? Check out the infographic here and educate yourself so you can help them.

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Do you struggle with heroin use? Do you need support with a loved one who has a heroin addiction? Then here’s what you need to do: contact Colleen on 0434 337 245  for a FREE 10-minute phone consultation on how she can best help you, or press book now to book on the online diary.

Be Daring, Be Original, Be You and Celebrate 30 Days Alcohol Free!

Be-Daring-Be-Original-Be-You-and-Celebrate-30-Days-Alcohol-FreeOne of my best moments of celebration was during a family caravan holiday to the Grampians, a beautiful location marked by mountains and forest. Being a couple with young children, our caravan was typically well equipped with every necessity for a happy, enjoyable and relaxing holiday – or so I thought. Unfortunately I made one important oversight – we forgot the board games which were a standard essential for children easily bored and looking to their parents for entertainment (These were the days before iPads and Facebook).

Not to be defeated and with a very fertile imagination, I came up with a game that involved the four of us hunting for clues around the park for the 4 day period. It was a fantastic holiday, made memorable by our family game and the way I celebrated at its completion. I danced, jigged, sung and hollered like a mad woman as I circled around one of the huge trees in the park. I loved it. It felt good. The feeling of happiness, fun, and joy as I gave myself up to that moment of celebration was delicious and infectious and I remember it to this day!

Celebrations are important to our lives. They mark certain moments as meaningful and memorable; opportunities to take time out to acknowledge the significance of who we are, what we have achieved, where we have come from and where we are going. A celebration is like an oasis – an opportunity to relax, recover and be present to the significance of what we have ascribed value to.

I wonder if it is in celebration that we experience the necessary ‘permission’ to be a child again? To laugh loudly and retell family stories, to dance enthusiastically (even if you have ‘two left feet’); to eat good food and recapture the sheer joy of being alive and present to the people you care about. Times like these are priceless.

What are your best memories? Most of us learn ways to celebrate through our family, community and cultural experiences. The things you celebrate, where you celebrate, who you celebrate with and what you consume as you celebrate, are all to a greater or lesser extent, informed by former experiences.

What was the role of alcohol in your childhood experience of celebration? Was it central to the celebration or something of little consequence? In many cultures, including Australia, alcohol is regarded by many to be necessary to ‘having a good time’ because of its power to release inhibitions that generally bind and restrict us. However it is increasingly alarming to observe the negative impact alcohol is having on our society; domestic violence, family and relationship breakdowns, road trauma and acts of violence are being reported by the media every day. We need to turn the tide and one way to do this is to practice ways of celebrating that are less reliant on alcohol and more reliant on your capacity for fun and creativity.

I have great memories of celebrating Australia Day down at the beach with the church community that my family was a part of; getting buried in sand, building sandcastles, playing in the water, listening in to the conversations of the adults around me, sharing food, joining in the ‘mandatory’ game of beach cricket. These are carefree days where the normal routine of our lives could be put aside for a moment in time so that we could relax and be together.

More recently a family celebration around my outdoor dining table was memorable by its theme which was the death of my beloved father in law 12 months previous. Whilst that might sound morbid and depressing, it was in fact, a delightful opportunity to come together as a family to remember a person whose loving and kind ways made him dear to all of us. Food, non-alcoholic drinks, good company and lots of laughter defined our celebration and will remain long in my memory.

If you took the Go 30 Day Alcohol Free Challenge at the commencement of 2015, you are near completion which is cause for celebration. Well done! Sustaining any commitment takes effort, self-discipline and determination. The argument to ‘have a few drinks because you deserve it’ is very persuasive but also dangerous. Consider how you will celebrate and who you will celebrate with. Put some of the tips you received from Watersedge Go 30 Day Alcohol Free Challenge into practice and have some fun!

This year there will be plenty of celebrations going on in backyards and at the beach. Celebrate days that will be long remembered, days that your children will remember – laugh, dance, eat lots, play games. If alcohol is a part of the day, minimise the amount to ensure the safety of your guests, your family and yourself.

If you would like to take the opportunity to do the Go 30 Days Alcohol Free Challenge for the month of February, you can sign up for FREE now or anytime over this month. It is a great opportunity to take a ‘personal lifestyle stocktake’ and at the same time challenge your need for alcohol.

Should you or someone you love have an alcohol-related issue that is impacting your life, you can contact Duncan on 0434331243 or Colleen on 0434337245 for a FREE 10 minute consultation as to how we can best meet your need. If you are ready, you can make an appointment by going to the BOOK NOW button and following the prompts.

Alcohol and the Workplace

Have you ever shown up to work with a hangover? It makes for an ugly and difficult day, but for many of us it has become normal. In fact, this infographic by Recovery Connection tells us that 15% of all workers in the US are under the influence of alcohol at one time or another. It is easy to assume alcohol only effects ‘alcoholics,’ but the truth is that most alcohol related issues within the workplace come from social drinking. Whether we drink before work or arrive with a hangover, it is something which impacts not only our productivity in the workplace, but also our personal health.

This infographic gives us a list of the industries most likely to contain ‘problem drinkers,’ and it shows that people who do evening, night or sporadic shift work are at the top of the list. In fact, construction and mining, retail, and hospitality all made the top five. And you don’t have to drink at work to be effected by alcohol; research shows that sick days, sleeping at work and trouble with tasks and colleagues are all side effects of problem drinking.

Problem drinking can affect anyone. If you are younger, are a male and work in a managerial position, research shows you are more likely to fit into this category. Do you think you struggle with alcohol at work? Ask yourself these questions:

Do you frequently drink before/after work?

Do you often arrive at work with a hangover?

Do you feel the need to drink in order to cope with the stress of your job?

Have you ever made an error at work due to being intoxicated or having a hangover?

Do you regularly struggle with your co-workers due to your alcohol use?

If you show signs of being a ‘problem drinker,’ you don’t have to struggle through life anymore. You have the ability to manage your alcohol consumption and in this, bring your A game to work on a daily basis.

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Do you need help to manage alcohol in the workplace? Do you desire to be bold, be daring and be you? Sign up for our free ‘Go 30 Days Alcohol Free’ Challenge here and step into 2015 with new confidence. For more support, check our estore for a special deal on the 30 Days Guide and Workbook. You can also contact WatersedgeCounselling on 0434 337 245 for a FREE 10-minute phone consultation on how we can best help you or press book now to book in our online diary.

Be Daring, Be Original, Be You!

Be_You_LogoWelcome to the New Year, and welcome to a new you. What do you hope 2015 will bring? Perhaps you long for a change in your relationships and the space to talk about things that have been hurting you. Or maybe you have resolved to look after yourself, and have plans to lose weight and become healthier? Whatever hopes you have for 2015, this is January 1 and this is a new start.

Over the past 6 months, the team at Watersedge Counselling have been busy contemplating what the New Year will mean for you, and we came up with the phrase, “Be Daring, Be Original, Be You.” It is our hope that in 2015 you are bold enough to assess your needs, are daring enough to challenge yourself to change your habits, and ultimately, find a heathier and happier version of you.

We want to give you the opportunity to find out who you really are, and to do this we are looking at one of the most common issues that affect people every day: alcohol consumption. Whether you are a casual drinker or find that alcohol is significantly impacting your relationships, the New Year is your chance to start again. We would love to invite you to take part in our new Go 30 Days Alcohol Free Challenge to do just that. By signing up for free on the WatersedgeCounselling website, you will have a new tip sent to your inbox each day for 30 days. Each tip is simple, practical and will help you to understand the role alcohol plays in your life.

The beauty of the Go 30 Days Alcohol Free Challenge is that it is designed to fit with your specific lifestyle. We know that some people just want to begin the year with a fresh and fun perspective. Our 30 Days Challenge can act as a motivator to help you get up and go every day, to achieve your goals and take better care of yourself. If you have resolved to take better care of your health, then this Challenge is your chance to cleanse your body and mind of unhealthy habits. And if you have found that alcohol is damaging your life, if your partner has shown concern over your habits or you simply don’t know how to get through the day without a drink- then this challenge is for you as well.

“Be Daring, Be Original, Be You”- what do these words mean for you? We want you to enter 2015 encouraged and inspired, because we believe that you have the capacity to grow and cultivate healthy relationships this year. Join us on this journey and sign up for our 30 Days Alcohol Free Challenge now.

If you really want to start the year with renewed focus, we have also written a Guide to accompany this Challenge. Available as an ebook in our web store, this Guide will take you through each of the main themes that will come up over the 30 days. Addressing everything from healthy habits to an accountability partner, we have penned this to provide you with strategies to overcome most any challenge in your life. And if you have a friend or family member who needs some support as they minimise or cut out alcohol for the month, then this is a great resource to help you understand and support them.

If our daily tips inspire you, you can even check out the Workbook also available in our eStore. Chock full of beautiful graphics and practical tips to outwork each day’s goal, the Workbook gives you the space to write down your thoughts, plan ahead, and watch your progress. For a limited time, you can purchase the 30 Days Alcohol Free Guide with the accompanying Workbook for only $15.

Will you join us on our mission to start the New Year on the right foot? Be Daring, Be Original and Be You, and sign up for our 30 Days Alcohol Free Challenge now. Would you like some extra professional support as you begin the Challenge? Contact WatersedgeCounselling on 0434 337 245 for a FREE 10-minute phone consultation on how we can best help you or press book now to book in our online diary.

Is Your Loved One An Alcoholic?

The label of ‘alcoholic’ feels like a dirty word. Having a drink is a normal part of life, and it can be threatening to think a loved one could be controlled by alcohol. So where is the line between controlled alcohol consumption and alcoholism?

Perhaps you have a partner who loves to have a drink. The six pack in your fridge is an everyday occurrence, and you rarely see them without a beer or cider. How do you know when this is getting out of hand? This infographic by Recovery Connection highlights some of the key questions to ask yourself about a loved one’s consumption of alcohol.

Ask yourself if they frequently get drunk, have blackouts, or if they have gotten in trouble with the law due to the habit. If you have noticed your partner struggling to stop drinking, observed that they will skip social activities due to it, or they are displaying signs of guilt about their drinking, they may be struggling with alcoholism.

As you look at the questions posed in this graphic, listen to your gut. Do you feel like something is wrong in your relationship? Have you been concerned about your partner for some time, but have struggled to put your finger on what is wrong?

There are varying levels of alcohol dependence, but ultimately anything that is hurting your loved one and your relationship can be helped. If you are concerned about a loved one’s alcohol consumption but feel unsafe approaching them, don’t be afraid to seek outside help. If they are willing to acknowledge the effect alcohol has on your relationship and work on it, walk through the journey together.

Is Your Loved One An Alcoholic?

Do you have a loved one who shows signs of alcoholism? Do you need help to work through this, or have you found them unwilling to seek treatment? If so, contact Watersedgecounselling on 0434 337 245 for a FREE 10-minute phone consultation on how we can best help you or press book now to book in our online diary.

 

The Watersedge “Go 30 Days Alcohol Free” campaign launches on January 1!

Keep an eye on watersedgecounselling.com for details.

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The Truth About Alcohol and Abuse

The Truth About Alcohol and AbuseIt is very Australian to consume large amounts of alcohol, in fact it is a behaviour that envelopes much of our lives. President of the Australian Medical Association Brian Owler says this needs to change. In a speech given to the AMA National Alcohol Summit, he stated some of the raw and honest facts about Australians and alcohol abuse.

When the onus is largely on our personal use of alcohol and taking responsibility for our actions, Owler reminds us that the misuse of alcohol has wider repercussions than just the drunken behaviour of the individual. He shares, The devastating consequences of alcohol misuse extend from our cities into rural and remote areas and the number of alcohol-related assaults tops 70,000 a year.

With the overconsumption of alcohol can often come acts of cowardice and danger; many of us have heard about the fatal impact of the ‘king hit’ or the affect alcohol mixed with drugs can have on our bodies. But what about the ramification this behaviour has on the victims? There have been 24,000 cases of alcohol related domestic violence. And in addition to this, the misuse of alcohol can also contribute to child abuse.

In his speech, Owler highlights that there is no safe level of alcohol consumption during pregnancy. And from his own experience he shares, As a paediatric neurosurgeon, I frequently see the results of abuse of a child's brain. The brain swells dramatically. And if we do save the child, the brain often melts away on follow-up scans, and the child is permanently disabled. It's not even a matter of drunken violence.

When we drink alcohol without limits and allow ourselves to become intoxicated, we don’t just put ourselves in danger, we put those around us in danger too. Someone like me has to tell the parents that their son is quadriplegic – all because of a drunken night out. Alcohol-related harm doesn't stop at the front door. It enters people's homes.” Owler says.

And it is not just families and loved ones who are impacted by this; it is the victims of sexual assault, rape and violence. It is our children who grow up in an environment where it is normal to drink alcohol heavily because it is typically Australian. There is a safe way to consume alcohol, and Owler’s speech reminds us how important it is we learn how to do this; not just for ourselves, but for others too.

Brian Owler’s speech to the AMA National Alcohol Summit was published in the Sydney Morning Herald. You can read it here.

 

Do you struggle to limit your alcohol consumption? Maybe you want to learn how to keep yourself and your friends safe while you drink, or need help becoming sober. If so, contact Watersedgecounselling on 0434 337 245 for a FREE 10-minute phone consultation on how we can best help you or press book now to book in our online diary.

WatersedgeCounselling will be releasing our new “30 Days Alcohol Free” campaign soon to help you achieve a greater level of wellness in your life. Keep an eye on watersedgecounselling.com for details.

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Our Love Affair with Alcohol and Other Drugs

Have you ever paused to consider just how deeply your lifestyle and those around you have been affected by alcohol and other drugs?  In this infographic provided by the Australian Drug Foundation, we are shown the facts about our nation’s love affair with alcohol and other drugs. No matter what your age or socio economic factors, it is evident that these substances have negatively impacted our lives and will continue to do so unless we better educate ourselves and our families in these areas. This fascinating infographic shows us that we can no longer put our head in the sand- we must take responsibility for our own use of alcohol and other substances as the effects are more wide reaching than we ever imagined.

Our Love Affair with Alcohol and Other Drugs

Do you struggle with alcohol and/or other drugs and are concerned about their long-term effects on your life and those around you? If so, contact Watersedgecounselling on 0434 337 245 for a FREE 10-minute phone consultation on how we can best help you or press book now to book in our online diary.