The Enneagram, Addiction and Recovery

the-enneagram-addiction-and-recovery

We have long appreciated the personality theory of the Enneagram. It enables us to better understand one another, and means we can pin point what motivates people into a healthy and unhealthy state.

That begs the questions—could the Enneagram help us understand the path to addiction? And if so, perhaps it could assist people as they enter recovery.

This video interview from Enneagram Studies tackles these questions, intertwining a person's narrative or story with the Enneagram to provide insight into addictive behaviour.

In this video, TALK Editor Evangeline Welch interviews Renee Siegel for Enneagram Association in the Narrative Tradition. The interview identifies the typical patterns of addiction for each space—being what they refer to as Head types (Types 5-7), Gut types (Types 8-1) and Heart types (Types 2-4). They also delve into how each type behaves in addiction.

Focusing on the body as an energy system, the interview discusses what prompts different types to enter addictive behaviors, and what these often look like for each type, from eating disorders, gambling, workaholism, substance abuse, alcoholism or sexual acts.

Take a look at this video and let us know what it teaches you about the Enneagram’s role in addiction and recovery.

Are you or a loved one struggling with addiction? Do you want to learn more about the Enneagram and how it can help you enter recovery? Here’s what you need to do: contact WatersedgeCounselling on 0434 337 245 for a FREE 10-minute phone consultation on how we can best help you, or press book now to book in our online diary.

How Addiction Impacts The Family

Addiction isn’t a solitary illness. This means that even though only one member of the family may have an addiction, each other member is affected by it. In this infographic by Change to Change, we are shown the roles that family members take on during addiction. Aside from the person who is struggling with the addiction, you will also frequently see The Caretaker, The Hero, The Lost Child, The Mascot and The Scapegoat. Each member of the family falls into one or more of these roles, so their life individually, and the life of the family, is dramatically altered.

Do you align yourself with any of these roles? Perhaps you can see members of your own family or friendship group who have taken on these attributes? Because addiction impacts the whole family, it is useful for the unit to seek professional help in these circumstances. When we insist a loved one struggling with addiction seeks out help, we can also support them and our entire family by joining them on the journey to recovery.

How-Addiction-Impacts-The-Family

Do you struggle with addiction? Do you want to build a healthier and more stable family environment as a loved one works toward recovery? Then here’s what you need to do: contact WatersedgeCounselling on 0434 331 243 for a FREE 10-minute phone consultation on how we can best help you, or press book now to book on the online diary.

Geelong Counselling: How To Support Your Child’s Recovery From Addiction and Stay Sane At The Same Time

YoSee_the_sun_by_captivatedimagesu feel helpless, desperate and exhausted from lack of sleep and your constant ‘vigilante’ activity. You constantly question ‘what did I do to deserve this’ and, weighed down with the feeling that ‘I must have done something wrong’ you spend restless nights reliving all your greatest parenting catastrophes, wondering if ‘that was when things fell apart’.

You are a prisoner to your child’s unpredictable mood swings and anti-social behaviour. Your trust given is a trust broken and dangerously verging on irreparable. Repeated failed attempts to ‘fix the problem’ and a declining bank balance which is challenged only by your declining physical and/or mental health, have a ‘ripple effect’ on the wider family unit. Family relationships suffer as they are forced to take a back seat to the child whose substance issue demands complete attention. Family conflict erupts as the substance dependant member catapults the family from one crisis to the next.

If you identify with this experience, then this message is for you:

You did not cause your son or daughter’s alcohol or other drug problems.

You cannot ‘fix’ their problem.

 So here is how to  support your child's recovery from addiction and stay sane at the same time:

 1.  Try to provide support to your child rather than judging or criticising them. Criticism and judgemental words are powerful, having the effect of wounding your child further and creating distance. Your child will feel isolated, misunderstood and defensive.

2.  Avoid contributing to the situation, or colluding with your child’s behaviour by making excuses for them, paying their bills or apologising for them. Support your child not their drug use.

3.  Trying to avoid verbal and/or physical confrontation with your child will only worsen, not help, the situation. If you have fears for your own or your family’s safety, you should contact the police. You can discuss the possibility of taking out an intervention order.

For further information on alcohol and other drugs and Family Drug Support, go to the following links:

Information on alcohol and different drugs: DrugInfo.adf.org.au
Family Drug Support: fds.org.au
Family Drug Help: familydrughelp.org.au

 

If you are experiencing difficulties in your parenting or  need  support and encouragement, then here’s what you need to do, contact me on 0434 337 245  for a FREE 10-minute phone consultation on how I can best help you or you can make an appointment to see Colleen by booking online now.