How to deal with stress in everyday life

Stress influences everybody. Regardless of your age, sexual orientation or identity, we all know how stress feels. A great number of people choose to overlook the worry in their life since they think it simply comes from the pressure of their surroundings and they should ‘toughen up’ and ‘get over it’. However, when stress is ignored, it can influence our lives significantly.

Stress can be positive and negative. Positive pressure will influence you to work when you don't feel like it and you will accomplish your objectives. Yet negative pressure will put an enormous STOP sign on your cerebrum and you won’t move forward.

This negative pressure will influence you to feel apprehensive and stressed, and it will estrange you from everybody. That is often the manner by which negative pressure influences your life—it begins positively, yet when the anxiety rises it develops into an awful expectation that pulls you down.

When we battle pressure, we must do it consistently. Discover an interest, schedule time or create a routine that will allow you to unwind consistently. This can include swimming, bicycle riding, going out for a stroll, perusing a book, and hanging out with your companions or family over a foosball table or other entertainment.

Create a routine and stick to it. When individuals have a strong routine in their life, they feel relaxed because it gives them the sentiment of control. You will realise that, regardless of what is going on in your life, you will unwind with that movement.

Bear in mind to put yourself first and let the pressure leave your body since it will enhance your life all around. As life goes on and stress comes your way, you will be able to better comprehend and oversee it. Remember—keep in mind to unwind!

How to deal with stress in everyday life

 

Do you feel stressed? Would you like support as you look for ways to relax and live a balanced life? Here’s what you need to do: contact Colleen on 0434 337 245 or Duncan on 0434 331 243 for a FREE 10-minute phone consultation on how we can best help you, or press book now to book on our online diary.

Mark Čop is a blogger who made this infographic about pressure since he sees the significance of managing worry in regular day-to-day existence. His most loved stressor is his blog about foosball, on the grounds that he is dependent on foosball and trusts that it is definitive against stretch treatment. You can read more about his treatment on his blog called the Foosball Zone

How to Cope With Stress

Stress is everywhere. It appears when your phone beeps in the morning, and you receive a text message asking you to arrive at work early. It comes when a bill arrives in the mailbox, when the in-laws suddenly appear at the door, or when you begin to feel sick.

What makes you feel stressed? I’m a planner, and when a situation comes up that is unexpected, I can lose my cool very quickly. I feel the knots in my stomach, become short tempered, and I hyper focus on the details so much I am unable to prioritise what is really important.

Over time, stress can take a huge toll on our physical and mental health. We are more susceptible to illness and our immunity suffers, we can experience insomnia, are continually tense, and our blood pressure goes up. You and I both know that a small stressor is the straw that can break the camel’s back, and soon even the most miniscule things can set us off. Lots of us live in constant stress, and it is the unwelcome guest in every conversation, every outing and even our dreams. When it’s not monitored, stress can have a detrimental effect on our lives.

The good news is that there are some basic steps we can put in place to combat stress. Small things like eating a healthy diet, exercising and making ‘you’ time can help you to it on a leash. Get organised and make a list, or plan a situation or event on paper. Journal about your feelings, play music and talk to a loved one about how you are feeling.

No matter how stressed we feel, we never have to carry the weight of life alone. By opening up and sharing life with the people around us, we alleviate the stress we feel and often, realise the situation is not as big as we once thought it was.

What are your favourite ways to de-stress? Perhaps you like to find a solitary place and read a good book, or maybe getting out all your nervous energy with a good run is more your style. Whatever technique works for you, make a point to schedule in ‘you’ time and take care of yourself. Life may be stressful, but we can control how we respond to it. So take charge and take care of yourself. You’ll be amazed at the long term benefits these simple practices can have on your health and wellbeing.

Take a look at this image by MyMentalHealthDay.org for more ways to manage stress.

How-to-Cope-With-Stress

Do you feel stressed? Are you looking for creative ways to relax and enjoy life? Then here’s what you need to do: contact Colleen on 0434 337 245  for a FREE 10-minute phone consultation on how she can best help you, or press book now to book on the online diary.

5 Tips to Manage Stress Over the Holiday Season

5-Tips-to-Manage-Stress-Over-the-Holiday-SeasonAs much as the holiday season is full of fun and food, it invariably also involves people dynamics. This is great when we want to look like a picture perfect Hallmark greeting card of a family, but we all know this is simply not true. Below the surface of the grins, laughter and greetings of, “Look how you’ve grown!” there is often an undercurrent of stress, anxiety and misunderstanding. This is not to say we don’t love one another- we do. But whenever a group of people come together who are tightly bonded, conflict tends to surface because we are in a pressure cooker of a social situation. This knowledge alone is enough to make many of us dread festivities.

So, how do we handle stress over the holiday season and still enjoy the company of our loved ones? Here are 5 tips that can make it easier for you this December:

  1. Be prepared

If you are anxious about holiday preparation, gift shopping or seeing family, pre plan how you will go about these activities. If the stress of holiday shopping is traumatic for you, arrange for a friend to go with you and go earlier in the season to save yourself from the Christmas rush. In the same way, plan how and when you will decorate, prepare Christmas dinner and schedule in how long you will see Great Aunt Susie.

  1. Don’t make assumptions

Granted, it is hard not to pre-empt what other family members will think, do or say during the holidays, but if they have not vocalised a concern to you themselves, try not to assume their behaviour is an attack or criticism of you. You’ll find festivities a lot more enjoyable when you take people at their word rather than questioning the intent behind their questions and statements.

  1. Don’t create conflict

It sounds strange, but often when we feel stressed and out of place we can make sarcastic remarks, begin topical conversations and try and bait our relatives. There is certainly a healthy and humorous side to this, bit when this sarcasm is creating conflict and propelling the tension in the room, it is smart to hold back. Just because you are aware of a conflict no one is talking about, doesn’t mean you need to bring it up on Christmas Day.

  1. Deal with conflict

The amount of relationship issues and differences of opinion that arise over the holiday season can be astronomical. While we don’t want to create conflict by stirring the pot and bringing these out to the open, it is still important we actually deal with these issues. If you feel able to, meet with your family member one on one and discuss your concerns in an honest and loving way before Christmas Day. If you realise that this is useless and could in fact create more tension in your family, then perhaps you need to look at how you respond to that family member in order to keep conflict at bay and to protect yourself.

  1. Believe for the best

Instead of dreading holiday festivities, come with a positive mindset that things are going to work out. Speak positive affirmations to yourself like, “I am capable of doing this,” “I have control of this situation,” or “This moment will pass.” Share your concerns with your partner or a family member you are close to. Ultimately, remember that this is only a few weeks in the year and it will pass.

If you need help and/or support  in your couple relationship as you approach this holiday season, you can contact Colleen on 0434 337 245 for a free 10 minute consultation or book online now by going to the button marked ONLINE BOOKING.