How to Cope with Traumatic News

How-to-Cope-with-Traumatic-News

Often when we watch the news, it feels like a constant barrage of heart break, negativity and evil is being thrown at us. It is important that we are informed and know what is going on in the world, but what do we do when it all becomes too much? There is a fine line between awareness and feeling the weight of the world on your shoulders. Many of us will feel a ball of anxiety sitting in our chest, may find it harder to sleep, and can replay scenes and headlines through our head long after the event has passed.

It is important that you know it is okay to feel like this. You don’t have to be directly impacted by traumatic news or a crisis to feel the effects of it, and we will frequently see our loved ones respond to these reports in a way that is damaging to their physical and mental health.

In this illustrated guide prepared by Lucy Fahey of ABC News, we are shown how traumatic news affects us. In fact, over 6 hours of news coverage a day has been shown to significantly impact people. It can change our mindsets, make us feel isolated, and can impact our normal, everyday activities. By highlighting the basic steps we can take to care for children and ourselves when traumatic news airs, we can implement the coping strategies we need to care for our wellbeing.

How to Cope with Traumatic News Infographic

Do you struggle with traumatic news coverage? Do you find it impeding on your everyday life? Here’s what you need to do: contact WatersedgeCounselling on 0434 337 245 for a FREE 10-minute phone consultation on how we can best help you, or press book now to book in our online diary.